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The writing revolution : cuneiform to the Internet / Amalia E. Gnanadesikan.

By: Gnanadesikan, Amalia EMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Language libraryPublication details: Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009Description: xii, 310 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 23 cmISBN: 1405154063 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9781405154062 (hardcover : alk. paper); 1405154071 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9781405154079 (pbk. : alk. paper)Subject(s): Alphabet -- History | Fotboll -- HistoryDDC classification: 411 LOC classification: P211 | .G58 2009Online resources: Table of contents only
Contents:
The first IT revolution -- Cuneiform: forgotten legacy of a forgotten people -- Egyptian hieroglyphs and the quest for eternity -- Chinese: a love of paperwork -- Maya glyphs: calendars of kings -- Linear B: the clerks of Agamemnon -- Japanese: three scripts are better than one -- Cherokee: Sequoyah reverse-engineers -- The Semitic alphabet: Egypt to Manchuria in 3,400 years -- The empire of Sanskrit -- King Sejong's one-man renaissance -- Greek serendipity -- The age of Latin -- The alphabet meets the machine.
Summary: In a world of rapid technological advancement, it is easy to forget that writing is the original information technology, created to transcend the limitations of human memory and to defy time and space. This book describes how this communication tool has conquered the world, making possible everything from complex bureaucracy, literature, and science, to instruction manuals and love letters.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Printed book Printed book IES Halmstad
Non-fiction 411 Gna (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. 281-296) and index.

The first IT revolution -- Cuneiform: forgotten legacy of a forgotten people -- Egyptian hieroglyphs and the quest for eternity -- Chinese: a love of paperwork -- Maya glyphs: calendars of kings -- Linear B: the clerks of Agamemnon -- Japanese: three scripts are better than one -- Cherokee: Sequoyah reverse-engineers -- The Semitic alphabet: Egypt to Manchuria in 3,400 years -- The empire of Sanskrit -- King Sejong's one-man renaissance -- Greek serendipity -- The age of Latin -- The alphabet meets the machine.

In a world of rapid technological advancement, it is easy to forget that writing is the original information technology, created to transcend the limitations of human memory and to defy time and space. This book describes how this communication tool has conquered the world, making possible everything from complex bureaucracy, literature, and science, to instruction manuals and love letters.

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